Woodside Lectures

The Lectures of William S. Woodside

Former CEO of Primerica 

The Center for Business Ethics has been given the unique opportunity to archive 80 lectures given by William Woodside spanning the years 1973 to 1992.  For this honor, we give special thanks to Mr. Woodside’s wife, Migs Woodside.

These ethically sensitive lectures cover many topics dear to Mr. Woodside’s heart including promoting the business world as an advocate for public education, expanding public-private collaborations, addressing ethical dilemmas within an organization, and explaining stakeholder repercussions as a result of corporate restructuring. 

We are confident you will find Mr. Woodside’s insights to be engaging, uplifting and morally inspiring.

Biography

Summaries

  1. 1973 - The Minority Viewpoint: A New Reality in International Trade
    Mr. Woodside addresses the issues of an American businessman being a minority presence in a foreign country’s market.  He notes the challenges one would face in international business transactions and negotiations.  He asserts that nations no longer are drawn into American investment solely because of the strength of the dollar.  Now, investments are negotiated based upon perceptions derived from personal interactions and experiences with an actual salesperson and the individual company involved in each transaction.   Mr. Woodside makes the statement that Americans will only be accepted internationally if they are willing to demonstrate to foreign countries that they are putting in more than they are removing.  
  2. 1983 - Why “Join a School” is Good for Business
    Mr. Woodside advocates that corporate volunteerism, involvement, and support can truly help a public school prepare students for the workforce and to be productive members of society.  He spells out the goals that American Can and Martin Luther King Jr. High School plan to achieve with their partnership. 
  3. 1983 - Martin Luther King Jr. (MLK) High School Graduation Speech
    Enlivening the senior class of 1983, Mr. Woodside reminds those present at commencement that businesses need to be involved in more than just the bottom line of making money.  Corporations must extend themselves into and cooperate with communities.  He believes that no community can exist if the different entities that make up the community are not looking out for one another.  He insists that the entity with the most resources should reach out to the other.  He describes how the employees of American Can have been rejuvenated through the partnership with MLK High School.   
  4. 1983 - Catholic Interracial Council Speech
    Mr. Woodside paints a vivid picture of the declining state of public schools in America.  Suggestions are given that continuous support from the business world is necessary for the improvement of these conditions.  He explains the “Join a School” program and how strategic partnerships could be the backbone for the success of future children of America.  He contends that “Join a School” is also a two way street and that American Can has benefitted a hundredfold by their relationship in the program with MLK High School.
  5. 1983 -The American Workforce in Transition
    This speech explains how small corporate decisions can have a larger ripple effect on society, especially when job loss is involved.  Many companies do not consider the effects their decisions have on stakeholders such as employees, their families, the towns, the government and others.  Decisions need to be made that minimize negative effects made on these communities and not just minimize the loss of profits.  Mr. Woodside offers a four point framework for decision-making that all upper management should consider when choosing between two hard alternatives.
  6. 1984 - State University of New York (SUNY) Purchase Westchester School
    Partnership Program Announcement
    Mr. Woodside welcomes this partnership program by calling it a milestone for his Foundation and seems optimistic that it will achieve much over the next several years. The program is essentially a collaborative effort between public, private and educational sectors through which projects would continuously be explored and developed in a systematic way, while maintaining efficiency and affordability.
  7. 1984 - Challenge to the Humanities Conference
    Mr. Woodside expresses concern over the decline of humanities in public schools. He says there is a need to design humanities programs to fit modern day business realities, without compromising fundamental ideas and values. As an example, he talks about the “Join a School” program run by American Can, in concurrence with Martin Luther King Jr. High School in Manhattan. The premise for making humanities more relevant is to bring it to life for students by trying the unusual and the unorthodox – as  it was accomplished by The Philadelphia Alliance, The Arts Program in New York City and such other outreach initiatives.
  8. 1984 - Progress through Partnership
    This speech includes the annual report that was reviewed at MLK Jr. High School.  It was a collaboration between the students and the staff at American Can Company. 
  9. 1984 - Public-Private Partnerships for New York City’s Future: The Corporate Role in Public Education
    Mr. Woodside speaks of the importance of public-private partnerships as the key focus to ensure America’s power as a leading nation.  He explains that in order to achieve this, public education can no longer be left to the government for sole support.  Mr. Woodside advocates that the decline of public education is due to the lack of support received from outside sources.  The commitment from corporations cannot solely be financial contributions, but through dedicated action such as assistance to administration or encouraging employees to volunteer.  By providing his audience the example of his company’s partnership, American Can and MLK Jr. High School, Mr. Woodside shows that a public-private partnership has significantly benefitted the greater good of society. 
  10. 1985 - Educating the Workforce for the 1990s
    Mr. Woodside emphasizes the importance of political support for schools that cater to minority and disadvantaged young students. He asserts a need for greater collaborative commitment of money and public policy for public education. Furthermore, Mr. Woodside stress the importance of building a high degree of public support for the cause. In order to have an impressive outcome, Americans must reaffirm their faith and support in the public education system and reinvest in it to make quality restorations.
  11. 1985 - Business in Education: How Good a Grade
    The achievements of various business and education partnership programs like “Adopt a School”, mentorships, curriculum renewals, donations of equipment and joint councils on economic education are encapsulated by Mr. Woodside. He adds that a more active and consistent support mechanism is required to initiate new tasks, like building coalitions, and to encourage strong, secure and generous public support.
  12. 1985 - Remarks to Florida A & M
    In this speech, Mr. Woodside lectures about the lessons the American business community has learned in a changing economic climate and how his company, American Can, repositioned itself for future growth.  He stresses the necessity for a game plan that matches the rapid speed of economic cycles and their unpredictability.   He addresses the changes that were necessary at American Can in order to position the company to be sustainable.  Also, he reports the positive results that ensued.
  13. 1985 - MLK Jr. High School Symposium and Speakers
    Mr. Woodside speaks of the importance of Martin Luther King Jr.’s crusade for equality in America.  He honors him as a great American leader who fought to protect the rights of anyone who needed protecting and tells of the importance of everyone reaching out to those in need. 
  14. 1985- Acceptance Speech at Public Education Association
    Mr. Woodside reiterates the importance of private-public partnerships using the example of American Can’s partnership with MLK Jr. High School.
  15. 1985 - Illiteracy
    This is a speech given to both the House of Representatives Sub-Committee on elementary, secondary and vocational education and the Senate Sub-Committee on education, arts and humanities. Mr. Woodside powerfully states that illiteracy slows the individual, becomes a burden to corporations and tarnishes the image of equal opportunity in a democratic society.  The costs are extremely high for society and should not be tolerated. 
  16. 1985 - Hunger in America
    Through this speech, Mr. Woodside raises awareness about the pervasiveness of hunger and poverty in the United States.  He challenges that just because we are one of the wealthiest nations does not mean that people are not suffering daily from malnourishment, a lack of adequate resources and support.  Mr. Woodside rallies for support through providing compelling statistics regarding these issues. 
  17. 1985 - Children’s Express-Comments
    Mr. Woodside expresses his appreciation of being honored by a younger generation regarding his fight on the war against poverty.  He reiterates the urgency that is needed to solve the problem for children living in poverty and that they should not have to pay for the poor choices of previous generations. 
  18. 1986 - Education: A Public Role for the Private Sector
    Mr. Woodside believes that partnership programs are essential for a deep understanding of issues faced by public schools. The future success of these programs depends on the level of commitment by all involved. A high level of dedication is required to take the initiative forward and make it all-inclusive by embracing causes for disadvantaged and minority group children.
  19. 1986 - Managing Change: The American Can Company Experience
    Mr. Woodside describes how necessary it was for American Can Company to make significant changes in order to survive as a vital American company.  However, throughout these positive changes, Mr. Woodside also addresses the dark side of the moon: layoffs.  He asks his audience to consider if there is too much emphasis placed on short term returns for shareholders.  According to Mr. Woodside, there is a need for balance between short and long term goals.  He concludes that private decisions have public impact.  The responsibility of companies does not lie solely with the shareholders, but extends to employees, families, and local and national economies.
  20. 1986 - Sky Chef Management Conference
    This speech centers on the importance of corporate culture and how it ensures a commitment to quality control and other important business measures.  A company’s message is effective and efficient only if everyone is onboard for the same message.  The key to success is bridging the communication gap and encouraging employees to speak up about issues and problems.  They need to feel that the company has a corporate culture that is not authoritarian and rewards them for their suggestions about improvement.  Furthermore, upper management must also “walk the talk”.  They must understand that it takes participative management and the idea of “quality first” to be successful. 
  21. 1986 - Corporate Response to Hunger in America
    In this remarkable address about the reality and management of hunger and malnourishment in the United States of America, Mr. Woodside discusses results reported by Food Research and Action Center, Second Harvest and Physicians Task Force on Hunger. Further, he talks of varying levels of circumstances that lead to malnourishment (unemployment, reduced unemployment insurance, increased tax burden, poverty) and the inadequate response by federal agencies in the country.
  22. 1986 - Citizens Union Dinner Acceptance Remarks
    In this address, Mr. Woodside is quick to acknowledge the shortcomings of governmental programs but also chooses to tell the audience that this should not result in giving up on this entity.  Instead, we must restore our faith in governmental officials and put more pressure on departments for it to succeed.  He believes that the government is ultimately the best way to approach widespread needs, such as education.  He realizes that it is not an easy task to restore the public’s confidence in the government, but it is a necessary one.  Mr. Woodside hails the efforts of the Citizens Union in accomplishing this task one citizen at a time. 
  23. 1986 - Allegheny Conference on Community Development
    Through providing his own experience with the partnership between American Can and MLK Jr. High School, Mr. Woodside expands on the notion of public-private partnerships.  He reiterates that the results can be seen as a significant improvement not only in the quality of education but also in the quality of life for the students, faculty, and administration.  He acknowledges that the mutual partnership has opened doors and career training opportunities that could not have been made through government subsidies or by corporate sponsorship alone.  Lastly, Mr. Woodside closes with the need for corporate advocacy in support of public education. 
  24. 1986 - Poverty: The Unfinished Social Agenda
    In this speech, Mr. Woodside asks his audience to focus on the working poor and children amidst the affluence of the state of Connecticut.  He asserts that much of the working poor are significantly below the poverty line and also recently have received the biggest decrease in assistance programs.  To address the second main point, he includes relative statistics that children are paying the price for their parents’ economic shortcomings.  Furthermore, he believes that there are no future actions that can negate the past. For example, if a child has suffered problems like inadequate nutrition or emotional neglect the damage has already been done.  Therefore, we must keep children at the forefront of social programs. 
  25. 1986 - An Agenda for Improving the Teaching Profession
    The address announces the AFT Teacher Recruitment and Internship Program.  Mr. Woodside believes that it is an important collaboration between many different sectors: public and private partnerships, local school systems and higher education, and a mentorship between experienced teachers and college students.  Mr. Woodside makes it clear that there is no greater investment in the future of our nation, than to strengthen America’s public school system.
  26. 1986 - Bringing the Poor to the Economic Mainstream
    Mr. Woodside warns of the effects of the inevitable potential of an underclass.  The underclass would be defined as a portion of society that has a nominal role and minimal connection to the other part of society.  Mr. Woodside gives suggestions as to the social agenda that America should be adopting in order to avoid this from occurring. 
  27. 1986 - New Challenges in Poverty
    The speech encourages Americans to not rest on their laurels even if they themselves are in a good financial situation because poverty is still present in other Americans’ lives.  The social vision of the Great Society must be realized and Americans must once again instill a sense of compassion for the wellbeing of fellow men in order for poverty to be eradicated.  Suggestions for achieving these goals include: building upon underfunded programs, targeting programs to the working poor and children, and lastly improving education. 
  28. 1986 - America’s Unfinished Social Agenda
    Mr. Woodside addresses several city mayors about the problems with American Society.  He encourages that the social vision of the Great Society must be realized and Americans must once again instill a sense of compassion for the wellbeing of fellow men in order for these goals to be achieved.  Suggestions for achieving these goals include: building upon under funded programs, targeting programs to the working poor and children, and lastly improving education. 
  29. 1986 - The Future of Public-Private Partnerships
    The successful future of public-private partnerships can only be realized with the committed help of government funding, Mr. Woodside argues.  There is a fear in the business community that once businesses become involved with a nonprofit organization, the federal financial aid will gradually decrease as a result.  Mr. Woodside argues that this is an injustice and the only way the business world can have a meaningful effect is with the continued help from the government. 
  30. 1986 - Leadership Not a Trivial Pursuit
    Mr. Woodside contends that a first-rate education system for all is a goal that every American should strive to pursue because the future of towns, communities and states are in the hands of the next generation.  He believes that extensive action by a variety of public and private leaders must be taken to ensure this happens successfully. 
  31. 1986 - Building Support for Better Schools
    This speech analyzes the idea of actions trumping words when it comes to building a better educational environment for future generations.  Mr. Woodside believes that education is the gateway to endless opportunities in this country. Furthermore, he states that excellent public school teachers are a way to expedite and increase the chance that these opportunities are realized.  At a time when much reform is needed, he believes that a budget cut in federal spending on public schools is ludicrous. 
  32. 1986 - A Corporate Response to Hunger in America
    Through this speech, Mr. Woodside raises awareness about the pervasiveness of hunger and poverty in the United States.  He challenges that just because we are one of the wealthiest nations does not mean that people are not suffering daily from malnourishment, a lack of adequate resources, and support.  Mr. Woodside rallies for support through providing compelling statistics regarding these issues. 
  33. 1986 - Education: A Public Role for the Private Sector
    Mr. Woodside advocates for the use of public-private partnerships for the profit of all involved.  He believes that even with support from every corporation however, that is not enough.  America must focus on the issues that involve the education system as a whole, such as the political arena.
  34. 1986 - Business Roundtable
    Mr. Woodside advocates for the use of public-private partnerships for the profit of all involved.  He believes that even with support from every corporation however, that is not enough.  America must focus on the issues that involve the education system as a whole, such as the political arena.
  35. 1987 - Managing Change: The Primerica Experience
    Mr. Woodside describes how necessary it was for Primerica Company (formerly American Can) to make significant changes in order to survive as a vital American company.  However throughout these positive changes, Mr. Woodside also addresses the dark side of the moon:  layoffs.  He asks his audience to consider if there is too much emphasis on short term returns for shareholders.  According to Mr. Woodside, there is a need for balance between short and long term goals.  He concludes that private decisions have public impact.  The responsibility of companies does not lie solely with the shareholders but extends to employees, families, and local and national economies.
  36. 1987 - Opening Remarks to Northeast Midwest Leadership Council
    In his opening remarks to the leadership council, Mr. Woodside discusses legislative opportunities for reform in the 100th Congress. He stresses the council’s critical role in recommending public policies to senior members of Congress. He also elaborates on specific initiatives that can help create jobs and expand businesses. 
  37. 1987 - Testimony on Secondary and Vocational Education
    Mr. Woodside calls for business leaders to become involved in the political process as advocates for greater public support to public education. He applauds the rising interest of the business community in public education and hopes that this partnership will be sustained through efforts on local, state and national levels.
  38. 1987 - Dropouts in America: Enough is Known for Action
    In this lecture, Mr. Woodside confronts the subject of the dropout problem in public schools and points out ways to meet the educational and social needs of those children who are most at risk. He emphasizes a need to develop a plan of action that would help in responding more vigorously and comprehensively to the dropout problem.
  39. 1987 - Fighting Hunger in America: Developing a Plan of Action
    Mr. Woodside speaks of how important it is for the federal government to provide a foundation and stability to hunger programs. He reiterates that without the support of the federal government, the private sector would be unable to address the issues of hunger and malnutrition. In addition, he talks of how hunger damages infant health, chiild growth and development.
  40. 1987 - The Success of the SUNY Purchase Westchester School Partnership Program
    Mr. Woodside welcomes the partnership program between SUNY Purchase and Westchester School by calling it a milestone for his foundation and seems optimistic that it will achieve much over the next several years. He discusses how an alliance like this could explore and develop projects in a systematic way, while maintaining efficiency and affordability.
  41. 1987 - Meeting the Challenge of Change – National Urban Coalition
    In this address, Mr. Woodside reflects on how the National Urban Coalition (NUC) came to be formed and discusses its many contributions to society. He further says that NUC has helped shift the focus on ways that public and private sectors can work together to solve serious national urban problems. He also believes that NUC’s vision and leadership will be instrumental in developing programs in the future.
  42. 1987 - Commencement Address to SUNY Purchase
    In his commencement address to the graduating class, Mr. Woodside talks about SUNY being a remarkable institution because it contributes to needs of the society and the world at large. He goes on to tell the students to be self-reliant and responsible citizens of the world.
  43. 1987 - New York City Education Policy Fellowship Program – Remarks
    In his opening remarks, Mr. Woodside discusses roles and responsibilities of contemporary local school boards.  He touches upon differences between school boards over a variety of issues and stresses the importance of working towards a unified view of education.
  44. 1987 - Northwest Midwest Leadership Council – Remarks
    In his address to the leadership council, Mr. Woodside stresses the council’s critical role in recommending public policies to senior members of Congress. He also elaborates on specific initiatives that could help create jobs and expand businesses. 
  45. 1987 - Setting the Education Agenda – Address to the American Association of School Administrators
    Mr. Woodside appreciates the complex nature of the work performed by public school administrators because he believes they operate under many constraints with fewer resources than those in the private sector. He also discusses the status and future of the public education system in the United States and talks about the difficulty of managing change in public education.
  46. 1987 - The Changing Role of the Private Sector – Remarks to Public Education Fund
    Mr. Woodside discusses the involvement of corporations in public education and describes how partnership programs have helped in creating a deep understanding of issues faced by public schools. He adds that the private sector needs to become a driving force for building coalitions and encouraging strong, secure and generous public support for the cause of public education.
  47. 1987 - Northwest Midwest Leadership Council – October 13th Remarks
    In his address to the leadership council, Mr. Woodside emphasizes the council’s critical role in recommending public policies to senior members of Congress. He also elaborates on specific initiatives that can help create jobs and expand businesses. 
  48. 1987 - The Changing Role of the Private Sector in New York State
    Mr. Woodside discusses the success of “Join a School” or “Adopt a School” program that was initiated in New York City’s Martin Luther King Jr. High School in 1982. The program has been successful in achieving improved teacher morale and improved student performance. He talks about problems encountered in launching and continuing the program.  However, he counters with reaffirming the school’s success through the enthusiasm of the school’s students, teachers, and administration.
  49. 1988 - Whose Children Are They Anyway – presented to National Governors’ Association
    This lecture discusses the need for building a broader coalition in support of children-centered issues. It encourages involvement of the private sector in areas related to health, growth and development of all children in this country. Mr. Woodside proposes initiatives that would help improve the lives of children and give them a better chance to succeed as adults.
  50. 1988 - Business as a Child Advocacy Group – A Call to Action
    In this lecture, Mr. Woodside considers the possibility of schools delivering not only educational services but also services that address specific issues for children belonging to diverse communities. He talks about how schools need to adopt a role that contributes to helping children become educated, healthy and balanced adults.
  51. 1988 - Regional Plan Association – Comments
    Mr. Woodside discusses plans to develop the Bronx and touches upon initiatives that were carried out in the past like increasing park space and building better transportation. In the future, the association proposes to focus the attention of people outside of the Bronx on its progress and potential.
  52. 1988 - Children:  It’s Time to Invest in our Future
    Mr. Woodside addresses the issue of how to provide every child in this country with an opportunity to grow and develop in an environment that is healthy and secure.  He believes there is a huge hope for corporations to become committed to tackling educational and health care needs of children. He makes a recommendation for business sectors to increase their involvement in children’s welfare initiatives.
  53. 1988 - Connecticut Association for Human Services, Council of Sponsors – Luncheon Remarks
    In this lecture, Mr. Woodside talks about the problems of poverty in America and its detrimental effects on physical, intellectual and emotional development in children.
  54. 1988 - Investing in Prevention – Center for National Policy Luncheon
    In this lecture, Mr. Woodside talks about the problems of poverty in America and its detrimental effects on physical, intellectual and emotional development in children.  He discusses how the harmful impact of poverty can be prevented by taking adequate measures.
  55. 1988 - Business Role in the Improvement of Public Education
    Mr. Woodside focuses on the role of public education in the United States and the need to broaden the context in which we view schools and education.  He also talks of a need for greater involvement of business leaders in public education.
  56. 1988 - Education Commission of States -Remarks
    Mr. Woodside calls for a serious national effort to improve the educational, social and economic status of children in the United States by building a broader political coalition. He also suggests ways to engage private sector leaders in discussions on these concerns.
  57. 1988 - National Commission to Prevent Infant Mortality - Remarks
    In this address, Mr. Woodside recommends open advocacy by corporations to help focus public attention on matters concerning health in children. He advises corporations to expand their interests and programs in areas of health and well being in children. Additionally, he suggests working in conjunction with community groups to raise awareness at local and national levels.
  58. 1988 - Grant Makers for Children and Youth – What Children Really Need
    Mr. Woodside critiques the response of the nation as a whole to the needs of poor children in America. He explains how grant making institutions can develop new operating strategies and grant programs to improve living conditions for children who fall below the poverty line. Lastly, he urges philanthropic organizations to become more active, vocal and assertive advocates for children in the public policy making arena.
  59. 1988 - Private Sector Support for Public Education
    Mr. Woodside discusses involvement of corporations in public education and describes how partnership programs have helped in creating a deep understanding of issues faced by public schools. He adds that the private sector needs to become a driving force for building coalitions and encouraging strong, secure and generous public support for the cause of public education.
  60. 1988 - Joint Economic Committee for Education and Health – Remarks
    In this lecture, Mr. Woodside addresses two issues – the need for more pre-school programs and the need to provide full access to post-secondary education.
  61. 1988 - MLK Jr. High School Graduation Speech
    Mr. Woodside acknowledges several young success stories of MLK Jr. High School and offers them scholarships for their actions.
  62. 1988 - Sky Chef Management Conference
    Mr. Woodside engages Sky Chef Management and employees in his belief that “Participative Management and Quality First” are the keys to success. 
  63. 1989 - Testimony for the House Ways and Means Committee
    This speech advises the House of Representatives Ways and Means Committee to reduce the budget deficit in order to truly benefit American economic development.  Then Mr. Woodside presents the need for an increased focus on primary and secondary education. 
  64. 1989 - Fall Planning Conference
    Mr. Woodside evaluates the previous three years at Sky Chef and how the improvements have been measured.  He also delves deep into structural changes that are necessary in order for the company to grow to be number one in its industry. 
  65. 1989 - National Health Policy Forum Remarks
    Mr. Woodside comments on the poor resources available for non-college bound youth and the effects this has on society. 
  66. 1989 - Children, Schools, and Business
    This speech informs listeners that a link between companies and education is needed.  If companies do not assist elementary and secondary school education, society will not have as skilled or as intelligent of a workforce in the future.  Mr. Woodside advises that this partnership is imperative for America’s success.  New York City schools and companies are used as examples.
  67. 1989 - Care for our Children; Care for our Future
    According to Mr. Woodside, there are aspects of the American social and economic structure that must be revisited such as prenatal care.  He stresses the importance of having the private sector support children and families in the critical development period of ages 0-6.  If no one assists during this period, Mr. Woodside states that the window of opportunity is gone. 
  68. 1989 - National Association of Manufacturers, Joint Economic Committee
    Mr. Woodside combines previously addressed subjects to emphasize the necessity of corporate assistance to develop better programs that address prenatal, child, adolescent, college-bound and those not college-bound individuals’ needs.  He suggests corporate partnerships to better these conditions.
  69. 1989 - Who are the Children in Need and What is their Impact on All of Us  
    Mr. Woodside tells his audience that there have not been any successful economic redevelopments that did not include the private sector.  He gives examples of different forms of partnerships which include varying levels of participation between a for-profit business and a non-profit business.  He reiterates his previous statistical evidence about the need for equal educational opportunities in America, in order for it to compete with other industrialized countries. 
  70. 1989 - Ride the Third Wave
    Mr. Woodside tells his audience that there have not been any successful economic redevelopments that did not include the private sector.  He gives examples of different forms of partnerships which include varying levels of participation between a for-profit business and a non-profit business.  He reiterates his previous statistical evidence about the need for equal educational opportunities in America, in order for it to compete with other industrialized countries. 
  71. 1989 - Turning Points: Preparing America’s Youth for the 21st Century
    Mr. Woodside asks his audience to take a comprehensive view of “at risk” teens and in doing so, identifies certain factors which attribute to the issue.  He believes there is not one single issue, but a myriad of factors that contribute to a young person’s downfall.  He advises Americans that we are doomed if we ignore or brush aside disadvantaged youth.  He believes that if corporate America is advocating for a better education for young people, the message will have a more profound impact.  Mr. Woodside argues that this message will be effective as a result of the stereotype that businessmen have a more conservative approach to increasing government spending and taxes. 
  72. 1989 - Teaching is America’s Business
    This speech tells how essential teaching is to the growth of America.  Mr. Woodside states that private companies are ready to support educational programs; they just need to be informed.  He insists that teaching reform must happen instantly for the change to truly take effect. 
  73. 1989 - Education Panel: Independent Sector
    Mr. Woodside spells out how he believes education reform could happen.  He tells of each sector: government, independent, non-profit, and for-profit and how each can help improve the problem.  For the business sector, he suggests advocacy is their most effective support.  However, it is also important for them to donate monetary support and to provide continuous feedback to educational institutions so the unprepared workforce cycle does not occur again.
  74. 1989 - Disadvantaged Children and our Future
    Once again Mr. Woodside provides negative statistical evidence to the profile of education in America.  He insists that teaching reform must happen instantly for the change to truly take effect and to prevent further harm.
  75. 1991 - House Budget Committee-Testimony about the Women, Infant, and Children (WIC) Program
    Mr. Woodside addresses the House Budget Committee to tell of the multitude of effects which would result from removing some of the Women, Infant, and Children (WIC) budget to cover the deficit.  He describes that developing children should be at the forefront of funds and how many would benefit from increased budget allowance.  He uses this thought in a business mindset that today’s children are tomorrow’s workforce.
  76. 1991 - Child Development and Education
    Mr. Woodside updates his previous speeches with even more relevant negative statistics about children and teens in relation to missed opportunities and problems with the educational system. 
  77. 1991 - Educational Partnerships: Where do Academic Medical Centers Fit
    Mr. Woodside encourages strategic partnerships between the medical world and educators as the best approach to better inform teachers about health issues. With their increased knowledge teachers can properly educate their students.  Mr. Woodside believes this will result in a ripple effect and ultimately help children to succeed by making their teachers more educated in areas that are not typically in their expertise. 
  78. 1992 - Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism--Education:  The Search for Solutions
    William Woodside identifies, discusses, and proposes solutions to problems affecting education. Mr. Woodside focuses on the beginning and end of the education process.  Studies have indicated that children who enter school disadvantaged by poverty have significantly higher school failure and dropout rates than children who are not disadvantaged by poverty.  Woodside also focuses on the end of the education process because the lack of a good education system results in poorly educated adults. In turn this creates a poorly educated work force without significant intellectual power.  The lack of intellectual power in business creates fewer employment opportunities and provides less of an incentive for students to graduate with decent grades. Furthermore, Woodside identifies education as the only long-term solution to urban poverty and drug abuse.  Additionally, he identifies a good school system as an essential means for producing educated adults who can play a meaningful role in our society.
  79. 1992- Is There a Life After Childhood?
    Mr. Woodside encourages his audience to stop neglecting social programs that will significantly improve the quality of life of future generations.  He believes that by investing fully in social programs to eliminate poverty and improve prenatal health as well as public education, America will be in a much greater situation nationwide.  The compelling statistics he provides are concrete evidence of the pervasive problem. 
  80. 1993 - The House Subcommittee on Elementary, Secondary and Vocational Education
    Mr. Woodside acknowledges that in the 1980s, efforts were made to restructure schools, but these efforts did not yield many results.  He went on to discuss the three reform initiatives that he found to be must important in improving the quality of public education.  Also in this address, Mr. Woodside explains that the average American voter does not know enough to judge the American school system, thus creating a barrier to reform.  Accordingly, Mr. Woodside states that it is the government's duty to lead without excessive regulation and to help the American people understand how American children measure up in a global economy.  Mr. Woodside suggests that the government should target educational funds to those schools and students most in need.