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Field-Based Collaborations

The Bentley MBA incorporates three field-based collaborations — two of them international — for the Innovation, Value, Environments, and Leadership themes.

You will join faculty and members of organizations at host sites to explore complex business topics. These two-week experiences bring together topics associated with the specific theme — and build on previous themes — in a real-world setting. Two of the trips are to international destinations.

September 2016: Paris, France
The cohort will be working with the consumer electronics division of Groupe SEB, an international household goods manufacturer. We will discuss design elements with company staff while participating in design-studio exercises and we will collaborate with engineers to develop a prototype of improvements for the US market on one of the company’s major products.
January 2017: Athens and Elefsina, Greece
What is the interplay between local culture and international business? That is the focal question for this examination of the role of culture in the economy. Working with faculty from the Master of Heritage Management program at the Athens University of Economics and Business, the Bentley MBA students will investigate archaeological sites and discuss Greece’s efforts to attract tourists by marketing its culture.

Past years' trips include visits to Chile, Ghana, France, Greece, South Africa, Turkey, and Atlanta, Georgia, to name a few.

March 2017: San Antonio, Texas
The Bentley MBA program returns to the I-35 corridor in Texas to learn about industries and their networks in one of the fastest-growing regions in the country. San Antonio proudly balances its local cultural blend while reaching out to international businesses. Building on our January experiences in Greece, we will explore the role of culture in marketing the city, while discussing local business’s efforts to develop their industrial infrastructure.

WATCH: Studying abroad as a graduate student, from the class of 2014

The field-based collaborations involve multiple stakeholder groups or organizations, and focus on issues relevant to all business sectors. Students are not working to solve a problem, but working to address an issue — generally one for which an actionable solution does not exist. The goals are to emphasize the proper approach for evaluating these persistent issues and to illuminate students' skills and limitations, both of which are core elements of being a competent leader.

The faculty member’s role in the collaboration is helping students apply key lessons and concepts gleaned from previous themes.