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UX Certificate Courses

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Spring 2019 Schedule 

Spring 

UX919C.001 Information Architecture (CRN 11066)  
January 17-18, 2019, 9am-5pm EST
Instructor: Gregg Almquist

UX922C.001 Usability Testing (CRN 11067)   CLASS IS FULL

February 7-8, 2019, 9am-5pm EST
Instructor: James McElroy

UX900C.001 Human Factors and the User Experience (CRN 11068)    CLASS IS FULL
February 28-March 1, 2019, 9am-5pm EST
Instructor: William Gribbons

UX960C.001 UX Boot Camp (CRN 11056)
March 11-15, 2019, 8:30am-5:30pm EST
Instructors: Debbie Cook, William Gribbons, William Hartman, Meena Kothandaraman

 

 

 

UX961C.001 Measuring User Engagement (CRN 11157)
April 4-5, 2019, 9am-5pm EST
Instructor: Shmuel Bollen 

UX921C.001 User and Task Analysis (CRN 11069) 
April 11-12, 2019, 9am-5pm EST
Instructor: William Gribbons

UX944C.001 Measuring the User Experience (CRN 11070) 
May 2-3, 2019, 9am-5pm EST
Instructor: William Albert

UX920C.001 Ethnography for Work and Design (CRN 11071)
May 9-10, 2019, 9am-5pm EST
Instructor: Gary David

UX915C.001 Prototyping the User Experience (CRN 50001)
June 6-7, 2019, 9am-5pm EST
Instructor: Minmin Yang

UX928C.001 Visualizing Information (CRN 50002)       
June 13-14, 2019, 9am-5pm EST
Instructor: Kirsten Robinson

 

All Program Courses

UX 900C Human Factors and the User Experience

Note: CEUs: 1.3

Designing usable products and an effective user experience requires an understanding of the human behaviors underlying the user's interaction with the product or service. Human Factors in Information Design introduces you to the applied theories relevant to the design of information products, systems, user interface designs and the larger user experience. This course is particularly relevant to those working with critical applications, diverse user populations, and new technologies. Foundations in Human Factors helps you design applications compatible with the user's goals and the strengths and weaknesses of the user's perceptual and cognitive processing systems. This course helps you to anticipate user requirements before product development, to explain the user's performance during usability and prototype testing, and to foster a smooth transition for users facing new technologies or information.

Students will learn to:

  • Gain a comprehensive understanding of human behavior and its application to enhancing experience design.
  • Weight a given behavior in the context of the user population(s), product requirements, and use environment.
  • Employ these practices in the design process to proactively enhance the user experience as well as to evaluate problematic areas in existing product designs.
  • Communicate the importance of this approach to the product design team and product owner
  • Consider and apply an understanding of human perception (sight, sound, touch, and gesture) to a user’s interaction with a product or service.
  • Apply principles of perceptual organization and design patterns to assist the user in rapidly organizing and navigating the designed space.
  • Appreciate and apply the foundational principles of cognitive psychology to create products that are intuitive, easy to learn, safe and productive.
  • Design to support demanding cognitive activities in the user experience such as reading, learning, decision making and the like.
  • Consider and design to support the emotional aspects of the user experience such as social connection, anxiety, motivation, pleasure, and gamification.
  • Apply these same principles to emerging technologies such as the IOT, conversational interfaces, cognitive computing, virtual reality and the like.

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UX 915C Prototyping the User Experience

Note: CEUs: 1.3

Prototyping is a key part of the user centered design process. A prototype can be used to sell ideas, create a shared vision, test and refine an interface, and provide the development team with exact specifications. In this course, you gain hands-on
experience in creating prototypes using both paper prototyping techniques and software tools (Sketch, inVision, Axure, etc). You’ll learn what types of prototypes work best at different stages in the design process and will identify the appropriate level
of fidelity required in your prototype. We’ll also cover the practical aspects of prototyping in different contexts, including prototyping in the agile process, in the goal-directed design process, and for usability evaluation purposes.

Key Takeaways:

  • Understand different types of prototyping and examples
  • Learn about the benefits of prototyping and scenarios
  • Get a clear idea about the prototype fidelity dimensions
  • Avoid common mistakes in prototyping
  • Learn about the history of prototyping tools and the frequently used tools
  • Gain hands-on practice of prototyping using paper
  • Practice prototyping using popular prototyping tools (Sketch, inVision, Axure, etc)
  • Learn about prototyping in the agile process
  • Learn about prototyping in the goal-directed design process
  • Learn about prototyping for usability evaluation purposes

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UX 919C Information Architecture in Web Design

Note: CEUs: 1.2

Information Architecture and the Web - this two day workshop introduces Information Architecture concepts ands deliverables and how they fit into the Development Life Cycle. It focuses on site and application organization to best facilitate access of content that supports user needs. Although this not a class devoted to deliverables, hands-on exercises will walk through creating artifacts for conceptual design and functional design, such as site maps, user flows and wireframes.

Key Takeaways

  • What is Information Architecture?
  • The historical context of Information Architecture
  • How Information Architecture has evolved as applied to user experience design
  • Adapting IA processes to different development methodologies
  • Common user-research techniques that feed the IA analysis
  • The importance of User Experience Strategy in determining project success
  • Top-down and bottom-up approaches to organizing content
  • IA Deliverables
  • Site inventory
  • Site mapping
  • User flows
  • Wireframing

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UX 920C Ethnography for Work and Design

Generally speaking, ethnographic research involves naturalistic inquiry aimed at capturing social phenomenon as they occur in a particular setting. Ethnographers can employ multiple data collection strategies to do this, but typically focus on participant/observation methodologies as a primary approach. While primarily found in social science disciplines such as anthropology and sociology, ethnographic approaches increasing are being applied in IT/IS fields for the purposes of achieving better technological designs, improving the user experience, and facilitating collaborative work. This course will introduce the student to the origins of the ethnographic method, discuss the theoretical bases of its use, identify strategies for successful ethnographic inquiry, develop initial skills for data analysis and reporting, and provide examples of how ethnographic studies of work and technological use have been used in a variety of business and organizational contexts.

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UX 921C User and Task Analysis

Note: CEUs: 1.3

This course introduces product designers and user researchers to the theory and practice of user and task analysis. It removes the analysis responsibility from the hands of an elite few and empowers all members of the development group with the analytical tools needed to identify, prioritize and accommodate user goals and requirements. This methodology builds on contextual and task analysis in a rapid application model, with a goal of moving usable products to market in a timely fashion. Topics include thinking like an analyst, establishing business goals, framing the problem, defining the end-user profile(s), formulating user goals, identifying universal behaviors relevant to the case, using field-based data-gathering methodologies, interviewing the user, interpreting user requirements, analyzing the task and documenting your findings. 

Key Takeaways

  • Build the case for conducting user requirements gathering
  • Define user personas and determine persona goals (value focus for each)
  • Redefine the problem space when appropriate – are you focusing on the right problem
  • Determine the alignment of user and business goals
  • Align business, user, regulatory, and technical requirements
  • Identify, document and manage tension and conflict across requirements
  • Determine when to automate work and when the user values engagement in the work
  • Define the task (work, process) and information structure that support goals
  • Understand the rapid task analysis concept and supporting data collection methods
  • Move from data, to insight, and finally product design
  • Move beyond incremental enhancements to product innovation

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UX 922C Usability Testing

Note: CEUs: 1.3

Usability testing has become the most preferred method for evaluating the ease of learning and use of high-tech products. It is used throughout the product development cycle, from early prototypes to released versions. It also is used to evaluate all types of technologies, from cell phones to Internet software, as well as online help and print manuals. In this course, you learn about the strengths and weaknesses of usability testing, including what the research literature says, and how to plan, conduct and interpret the results of a usability test. You also participate in live usability test sessions and watch videotapes of interactions between participants and test administrators. Special topics such as remote testing, building usability labs, and competitive testing will be discussed based on participant interest.

Key Takeaways: 

  1. Define and measure usability
  2. Distinguish between the different types of usability tests
  3. Establish user research goals for your usability test
  4. Create a screening questionnaire to recruit usability test participants matching your target user profile
  5. Develop a scenario and tasks
  6. Create a data collection plan
  7. Prepare the materials required to prepare, conduct, and analyze a usability test
  8. Gain awareness of other user research methods
  9. Effectively moderate a usability test
  10. Analyze and report on your usability test findings

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UX 923C Designing for Accessibility

Note: CEUs: 1.3

Accessibility is an important facet of user experience. Designing accessible interfaces is easier if you understand the range of disabilities, key principles of accessibility, how assistive technologies work, how users actually use them, and the pros and cons of web and mobile technologies. You will learn how to move beyond standards compliance to integrate accessibility in a way that creates equivalent, universally usable, and engaging web experiences for everyone. We'll examine the key standards, principles of accessibility, and latest trends such as WCAG 2.1 and ARIA. We then explore user needs, validation methods, and ways to engage users with disabilities in your user experience process. By the end of the course, you will have a firm foundation on how to design and evaluate the accessibility of systems.

Key Takeaways: 

  • Students will appreciate that accessibility is an important facet of user experience. (attitude)
  • Students will understand the range of disabilities, key principles of accessibility, how assistive technologies work, and how users actually use them.  (knowledge and skill)
  • Students will appreciate that accessibility does not just serve a relatively small number of users, but is part of a good design process and good business strategy that has benefits for all users regardless of disability. (attitude)
  • Students will have a high level understanding of the key standards, principles of accessibility, and latest trends such as WCAG 2.0 and ARIA. (knowledge)
  • Students will learn how to design and evaluate systems for people with visual disabilities (Blind, low vision, color blind) including people that use screen readers. (knowledge and skill)
  • Students will have a firm foundation how to design and evaluation systems for people with auditory disabilities (Deaf and hard of hearing).  (knowledge and skill)
  • Students will have a firm foundation how to design and evaluation systems for people with motor disabilities. (knowledge and skill)
  • Students will have a firm foundation how to design and evaluation systems for people with cognitive disabilities (e.g., memory, problem solving, and attention challenges). (knowledge and skill)
  • Students will learn how to move beyond standards compliance to integrate accessibility in a way that creates equivalent, universally usable, and engaging web experiences for everyone.  (knowledge and skill)
  • Students will understand user needs, validation methods, and ways to engage users with disabilities in your user experience process.  (knowledge and skill)

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UX 928C Visualizing Information

Note: CEUs: 1.3

Examine how visualization enhances our ability to think. The course begins by comparing the visual and verbal worlds, their strengths and limits, and how these media interact with various thinking tasks. Moving from this analysis, this course helps you to design a visual-verbal system in which the strengths of one medium support the weakness of the other. This approach more fully integrates the visual and verbal message in a way that dramatically increases the reader's understanding of the information. You examine a range of visualization formats including illustrations, icons, mind maps, decision diagrams, schematics, information maps, and dynamic visualizations. Learn to use these formats to support the complex cognitive tasks of problem solving, analysis, and decision support and learning.

  • Create visuals that exploit, enable, and extend our cognitive and perceptual abilities
  • Develop an appreciation for visuals that are functional and not merely decorative
  • Learn when to use visual and verbal media and how to combine them
  • Use private diagrams such as mind maps and concept maps to support creative thinking and concept formation
  • Review a variety of diagram types for decision making, problem solving, and exploration
  • Explore different types of pictures and choose the right level of detail
  • Understand and apply Gestalt principles and preattentive properties to create more effective visualizations
  • Apply the LATCH principle and choose the right structure for the data and task
  • Review a variety of tables, charts and graphs and learn which types are best for which applications
  • Understand the strengths and limitations of interactive visualizations, animation and video
  • Understand the historical context for information visualization

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UX 929C Field Methods and User Research

Note: CEUs: 1.3

Field methods complement lab and online studies and are an essential part of a user researcher’s toolkit. This course covers several types of field methods and user research, focusing on both qualitative and quantitative techniques. We will start with an overview of UX research and a discussion about how field methods fit in. Then, through lectures, case studies, class exercises, and group discussions, we will explore commercial ethnography (including home and office visits), diary studies, questionnaire design, focus groups, and the development of personas. In the classroom, we’ll practice ethnographic interviewing, and we’ll also spend one morning outside of the classroom in an exercise involving participant observation (web students will be able to participate in their community). Another classroom exercise will involve the cognitive pretesting of a questionnaire. Students will leave with a long list of recommended books, articles, websites, and videos.

Key Takeaways:

  • Conduct an ethnographic interview in class after learning about interviewing techniques (both semi-structured and ethnographic interviewing).
  • Learn how to create an observation guide for a home or ethnographic study.
  • Engage in participant observation (outside of the classroom) as part of a field study during the second day of class, after learning about the methods of commercial ethnography and contextual design.
  • Understand the ethics of doing field research and the principles of professional responsibility of the American Anthropological Association and the American Sociological Association.
  • Gain confidence to try new techniques and understand that in most cases there is no one “right” way to collect user experience information or to understand consumer behavior.
  • Learn the basics of survey design and all the serious errors that must be avoided.
  • Learn how to perform cognitive pretesting of questionnaires and to analyze an error-filled questionnaire in the classroom.
  • Learn how to conduct a diary study and choose among the three types of reporting, the multiple techniques for collecting data, and typical types of analysis.
  • Learn the basics of personas and focus groups.
  • Understand where to find online sources of UX information and how to continue learning most effectively.

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UX 930C Managing a User Experience Group

Note: CEUs: 1.3

This course helps participants re-engineer their development process to accommodate user needs more effectively. Beginning with the analysis of the user needs and ending with the assessment of a product in the field, this course guides you step-by-step through the world of user-centered design. Participants examine a variety of management topics within the context of cost benefits and the value added to your product. You and your clients realize the full range of economic and productivity gains possible from this process. Potential pitfalls and dangers associated with a user-centered philosophy are also examined through a diverse range of case studies.

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UX 932C Internationalization and the User Experience

Note: CEUs: 1.3

This course introduces you to the theory and practice of localizing product designs, including documentation, web hardware and software designs, and training programs. Moving beyond issues of translation, this course discusses localization from a comprehensive intercultural psychology perspective that includes language, verbal vs. visual presentation styles, communication patterns, issues of time and disclosure, and local customs. We also demonstrate techniques for engineering a culturally neutral global core for each aspect of your product design.

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UX 935C Designing the User Experience

Note: CEUs: 1.3

This course will explore the propagation of user requirements into design solutions. Students will investigate the design space through multiple perspectives to identify opportunities for innovation. The class will examine design stages and techniques through real-world examples and hands-on prototype development. Student teams will generate scenarios and storyboards providing a foundation to synthesize features into logical areas comprising an information architecture and interaction design. User experience concepts will be visualized in the form of paper prototypes as teams explore the relationship between content types, navigational metaphors, and creating a branded experience. Teams will share, critique, and defend their progress.

Key Takeaways: 

  • Five elements of the user experience: strategy, scope, structure, skeleton, surface 
  • Design Thinking principles and examples
  • Design planning integrated with generative and evaluative research 
  • Translation of research insights into design principles 
  • The role of metaphor and analogy in design 
  • Developing a vision statement and high-level scope for the UX
  • Conceptual modeling and descriptive/prospective frameworks 
  • Creating context scenarios 
  • UX design within agile development 
  • Designing for physical + digital experiences 
  • Developing skeletal designs with key views and screenflows
  • Storyboards: illustrating key path scenarios 
  • Paper prototyping 

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UX 944C Measuring the User Experience

Note: CEUs: 1.3

The goal of this course is to teach participants how to effectively use a wide variety of usability metrics as part of their everyday work. Participants will learn all the common usability metrics, as well as lesser known, but equally effective metrics. Participants will learn the strengths and limitations of each metric, when to use (and not use) each metric, and how to present usability data in a simple yet compelling way. Five distinct types of usability metrics will be covered: Performance, self-reported, issues-based, behavioral/physiological, and combined/comparative metrics. The course will be oriented towards practical use, with a strong emphasis on hands-on exercises and real-world examples.

Learning Objectives:
The following are key takeaways from of this course:

Knowledge:

  • Develop a broad awareness and understanding of all the different ways to measure the usability and user experience of various products.
  • Understand the strengths and limitations of different usability metrics, and under what circumstances different metrics should be considered.
  • Examine usability findings in a critical manner, understanding the role metrics play in being able to draw appropriate conclusions.
  • Learn with how various usability metrics have been used in past research studies with varying levels of success. 

Skills:

  • Use basic statistical techniques, including descriptive statistics, comparing means, analysis of variance, regression/correlations, and Chi-square analysis.
  • Analyze a wide variety of usability data, and being able to distill key patterns or trends in the data.
  • Develop a sound plan to collect a wide variety of usability metrics, given various time and budget constraints.
  • Present and report usability metrics in a clear and persuasive way.

Attitudes:

  • Value the importance that measurement plays in the user centered design process, specifically in usability evaluation methods.
  • Embrace both qualitative and quantitative research techniques.
  • Appreciate a rigorous, scientific approach to usability evaluation methods.

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UX 946C Beyond Usability: Developing a Comprehensive Understanding of User Experience

Note: CEUs: 1.3

We will discuss the importance of using converging lines of information (triangulating data from multiple sources) to create a comprehensive view of user experience. Through lectures, case studies, and hands-on exercises, usability practitioners will learn how important it is to collect both qualitative and quantitative data to build an end-to-end view of how your customers actually use and view your product, and what you can do to improve it. We will provide practical advice, plus review the strengths and weaknesses of different techniques within four broad classes: 1. Techniques that capture how customers actually use a product or service (e.g., web analytics); 2. Techniques that provide insight on use in realistic contexts and situations (e.g., ethnography, diary studies); 3. Techniques that focus on product interaction (usability studies, including remote testing); and 4. Techniques that reveal how customers feel about a product (e.g., surveys, social media monitoring).

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UX 953C On the Go: User Experience for Mobile Devices

Note: CEUs: 1.3

By now, most people we know own a mobile device. But, are people really getting the most from their devices? What is a good user experience for mobile? Do people use their mobile devices differently then desktop computers and systems? This course will teach you how to evaluate and design mobile interfaces, including software apps and hardware devices. Students teams will not only learn to evaluate mobile devices, but will generate use cases and scenarios to be used as the basis for understanding the user experience and then testing the devices. Not only will you learn about the latest research and UX techniques for mobile, but you will have the chance to test the devices in our labs.

Takeaways for Mobile Design

  • Know your users and design with them in mind
  • Understand the important elements of mobile design
  • Keep the design simple
    • To make everything easy to find
    • To make important functions easy to remember
  • Provide immediate feedback for all functions
  • Design for Multiplatform with responsive design concepts
  • Tests designs with real users, early and often
  • Iterate on designs after testing
  • Be Creative and make it fun

 

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UX 960C User Experience Boot Camp

The program highlights the growing importance of the user experience as a strategic business advantage and a point of differentiation in mature or hypercompetitive markets. As a leading business university, Bentley is uniquely positioned to deliver this perspective in a thoughtful and challenging learning experience. The five-day program is organized around five themes: Elements of the User Experience, User Research and Market Segmentation, Design Implementation and Innovation, Assessment and Measurement, and Process Improvement and Success Metrics.

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UX 961C Measuring user Engagement

Note: CEUs: 1.3

Emotional engagement is a key component in building customer relationships. Measuring engagement is a challenge, but one that must be met in order to show design success. In this two-day course, you’ll learn how to use and combine advanced research methods to find out how your designs make people feel. We’ll also learn how to use research results to help convince stakeholders that your designs will engage and delight.

Outcomes

  • Students will be able to appreciate and communicate the value of user engagement
  • Students will be able to place emotion within a UX interaction model and explain the journey from perception to cognition and action
  • Students will be able to explain how biological perception influences emotion both positively and negatively
  • Students will learn a simple method for assessing visual complexity within a user interface
  • Students will learn a simple method for assessing task complexity within a user interface
  • Students will be able to explain the limitations self-report/moderated research
  • Students will learn three methods for conducting desirability testing
  • Students will be able to conduct a Kano feature prioritization exercise and present the results
  • Students will learn about eye tracking, and will be able to set up an eye tracking study and collect/present the results to help support a design decision and build consensus on a project team
  • Students will be able collect physiometric measurements and correlate them to emotional state and then combine the findings with eye tracking data to give a complete picture of the journey from perception to cognition and finally to emotion and action

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UX 963C Introduction to Service Design and journey mapping

Note: CEUs: 1.3

Service design and journey mapping is focused on gaining insight into the end-to-end customer experience and using those insights to create an exceptional customer experience across all touchpoints. The course will be a combination of lecture, discussion, and hands-on group exercises. This course will answer questions such as:

  • What is service design and how can I leverage it within my organization?
  • What are the strengths and limitations to various exploration and design methods?
  • How can I create an impactful journey map?
  • What are the different ways I can measure the customer experience (CX) and use the data to create a roadmap for future CX initiatives?

This course will share examples across various industries and allow students to create their own service design project using a variety of exploration and design methods. The course will introduce a variety of exploration methods including stakeholder maps, service ecologies, field research, personas, and journey mapping. Design methods will include idea generation, service blueprints, and prototyping. The course will wrap up with a discussion on how to measure the customer experience and overcome challenges to implementation. We hope that students walk away for an appreciation of the power of service design, and how to get started in creating a great customer experience for their organization.  

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UX 964C Content Strategy

Note: CEUs: 1.3

Examines the emerging discipline of content strategy and its critical role and impact on design, creation, distribution, and governance of an organization's content. This course explores a variety of issues relating to the life cycle of an organization's content, including strategy, audits, the role of legacy content, content migration, and content management systems (CMS). Reviewing the role that staff, technical resources, and constraints play within content strategy are explored. Finally, the emerging direction and placement of content strategy within the overall user experience of both products and services is investigated.

Key takeaways

  • The role of a content strategist within an organization
  • The components of an effective content strategy
  • Conducting a content audit
  • Developing a content strategy process
  • Writing for the web
  • Conducting “Friends of Content” interviews
  • Content mapping and conversation mapping
  • Testing content
  • Content governance
  • Content migration

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UX 966C Enterprise experience design Consulting

Note: CEUs: 1.3

Pursuing a design career in a large enterprise can be vastly rewarding as
you are able to help these organizations focus on innovation and transform the business while being exposed to
the latest design and technology trends. Design consulting in the enterprise space is also a path that
brings unique challenges that require a different way of thinking about the practice of delivering
exceptional design experiences.

Topics include:

What does Digital Transformation actually mean?

Design thinking, hype or valuable?

How to be trusted advisors to clients, how to generate consensus, how to negotiate, etc. 

Designing together with the client and influencing as an outside contributor

Educating internal peers on design thinking approaches.

Staying atop of emerging trends such as Robotics, AI, Transformation and applying design thinking principles to be effective.

Maintaining a common approach and leveraging expertise across a distributed team.

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UX 967C Qualitative Data Analysis

Note: CEUs: 1.3

Qualitative research has the advantage of providing data that is rich information and detail. This is balanced by the volume of material you can gather, and how to analyze and package it. Collecting data is only half of the battle; you also need to know how to effectively manage it. This course will introduce attendees to approaches and strategies for doing qualitative data analysis. Through the use of qualitative data sets (provided by the instructor as well as the opportunity to use your own), the course will explore approaches to qualitative data management, coding, and presentation. Students will learn how to use specific techniques like Content Analysis, Conversation Analysis, Discourse Analysis, and Narrative Analysis. We will examine basic concept of reliability, validity and generalizability in qualitative research, and how to address these concerns. Finally, we will discuss strategies for preparing qualitative data for presentation in written and oral materials. This course in intended for those who are new to qualitative data analysis, as well as those who have some general experience but not using specific approaches covered in this course. Persons taking the course will leave better knowing how to structure their qualitative data so that they can deliver greater value and impact from its collection and use.

Key Takeaways

  • How to manage qualitative data sets
  • Ways to incorporate qualitative data and quantitative data together
  • Specific techniques used to analyze qualitative data
  • Computer programs to help in qualitative data analysis
  • Issues of reliability, validity, and generalizability in qualitative data
  • How to communicate text-rich data to audiences

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UX 968C Customer Experience

Note: CEUs: 1.3

As User Experience professionals, we typically spend our days designing or researching the way that an end user interacts with one or more products. Increasingly, UX activities are extending to “customer experience”, in an effort to get a richer picture of how our end users engage with every part of a service or product. Customer Experience encompasses not only user experience, but also every touchpoint between the customer and our products, services, and brand. These touchpoints can include emails, product packaging, onboarding, technical support, payment processes, return processes, physical stores, and can even extend as far as marketing campaigns, color palettes, and Super Bowl ads.

In the past we worked in silos, away from other groups in the organization, such as Strategy, Marketing, Sales, and Technical Support. Now, it’s more common for our activities to overlap and for us to partner with one another. That partnership allows us to create a deeper understanding of our users and to align on how we engage them.

In this course, we’ll start by defining delight using the Kano Model and Hancock’s Hierarchy, so we have a shared understanding of what factors can impact a customer’s perception of our product or service. Then we’ll talk about data collection instruments, including analytics, Net Promoter Score (NPS), and event-based surveys, as well as methods for analyzing that data. For example, we’ll see how confidence intervals can be used to determine whether we should be concerned when our average customer satisfaction score goes from an 8.2 to an 8.0. Beyond the numbers, you’ll learn how to segment and analyze qualitative data to quantify items that contribute to user dis/satisfaction, whether that data comes from ethnographic studies or write-in comments from surveys.

Next, we’ll explore methods to create personas to help us understand which of our users is interacting in which ways across which touchpoints. We’ll articulate the highs and lows of a customer experience by creating a customer Journey Map. And finally, we’ll use a lightweight Design Thinking / Design Sprint activity to come up with an approach to better meet their needs.

Key Takeaways

  • Articulate the difference between customer delight, satisficing, and basic expectations
  • Learn what types of instruments are used to collect customer satisfaction data
  • Articulate the strengths and weaknesses of customer satisfaction surveys, such as NPS
  • Practice analyzing both quantitative and qualitative satisfaction data
  • Learn different methods for creating personas that will resonate with stakeholders
  • Articulate how a single set of personas for a company or organization can be beneficial
  • Articulate the pros and cons between different persona development methods
  • Learn how to create journey maps, both static and interactive
  • Gain hands-on practice with a lightweight design thinking / design studio activity to come up with new solutions for customer pain points

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A Human Factors and Usability Framework for Medical Device Design

This four-day program presents a comprehensive human factors and usability engineering framework for medical device manufacturers. This program helps device designers address the new and more demanding FDA guidelines related to risk management processes. In addition to considering FDA guidelines addressing patient safety, this course also focuses on the contribution of an effective user experience to the ultimate success of a given product offering in the marketplace.


The Human Factors component of the program includes the following:

Examining the user's physical, perceptual, or cognitive abilities and how they align with the required interaction;
Defining and addressing implications of user profiles and understanding critical differences in capabilities between user populations;
Capturing task and process routines with a goal of enhancing ease-of-learning, improving performance and reducing errors;
Considering the use environment and how it affects performance, errors, and fatigue;
Mapping the device use to the user's expectations or prior knowledge about device operation;
Anticipating unexpected behaviors affecting performance or safety; and
Adopting performance support measures to reduce errors, optimize performance, and minimize user workload.


The Usability Engineering component of the program includes the following:

Designing and implementing ethnographic studies;
Conducting user research including interviews, observation, focus groups and surveys;
Moving from research to effective user requirements;
Balancing user, technical, and regulatory requirements;
Implementing requirements through participatory prototyping (high and low fidelity);
Evaluating interaction design through formative and summative testing procedures; and
Preparing a human factors and usability engineering report.


Each of these topics will be presented through discussion, case studies, and interactive workshops. When delivered in your development organization, elements of your use environment can be integrated in course discussions.
The FDA and an increasingly competitive marketplace have defined an ever-expanding role for human factors and usability engineering. Our instructors will offer a proactive approach to integrating these critical perspectives in device design and will contrast our strategy to the more common ad-hoc, late-in-development input or testing.

Cost

A Human Factors and Usability Framework for Medical Device Design:
$2,200 per student. (Minimum class size of 15). Discounts are available for larger groups. We encourage broad participation in this program including product managers, project managers, representatives from the engineering team, industrial designers, and members of your UX/usability team.

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